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Fitness and the Pandemic

The world fell apart on March 13, 2020. That's when the school I work at announced a temporary shut down. The "temporary" part lasted until the end of September. 

I was serious about social distancing to the point that I didn't leave my house. 

I also got no exercise. by July, my fitness was a mess. That's when I decided to buy a new bicycle. I didn't realize that EVERYONE else had also decided to buy new bicycles. 

I went to one of the Trek Superstores in San Diego and took a test ride on a Trek road bike. It was a nice bike, but it was built with a seat post that was too tall for me. The shop offered to swap out the seat post at an additional cost, which didn't make sense to me. I thought they should sell me a bike that fit me  Soon after I left the shop, I got a message from the shop offering to swap out the seat post as an even exchange.  However, the moment had passed and I didn't return the call. 

I'm glad I passed on the Trek, because, as I gave it more thought, I realize buying a stock Trek road bike wasn't much of an upgrade from the bike I was replacing. So, I did more research.

A couple of days later, I happened to see a ride a friend posted on Strava. It was his first ride on a custom built gravel bicycle. I had previously heard of the small company, Franco Bicycles. I contacted Hector at Franco Bicycles and made an appointment to meet him at his shop the next week. That's when I ordered a Franco Grimes gravel bike. 

It was a serious upgrade to my prior road bike.

Here is my build:

Frameset

Grimes Carbon, Color: CANVAS

Wheels MFG T47 Bottom Bracket

 

Groupset

SRAM Force eTap + XX1 Mullet Build

Crank Length: 175, 40T + 10-52T Rainbow

160 F/R Rotors

AXS Power Meter

 

Wheelset

HED Eroica GP, 700c

Panaracer Gravelking SK 700c x 38c, Tubeless, Black

 

Components

Whisky No. 7 Aluminum Stem, 100mm

Whisky No.9 Carbon Bar, 12 Flare, 44cm

Fizik Antares R3 Versus Evo Saddle


It took seven weeks to get the bike because of the supply chain. The SRAM AXS Power Meter was the last piece to arrive.


It's a great bike that turns heads when I ride it. As a gravel bike, it is a legitimate road bike that also holds its chops on gravel. The one-by build is different from other road bikes. That gets the attention of other riders.









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